Staying Safe Offshore Is Planning and Taking Care

Staying Safe Offshore

By Frank Sargeant, Editor
from The Fishing Wire

The death of a young angler off the Louisiana coast this week reminds all of us yet again of what each of should remember every time we step into a boat: you are responsible for your own safety once that vessel leaves the dock. No matter whether you’re within cell phone range of 911 or many miles offshore in SSB range only, the brave folks charged with coming to get you often cannot get there in time to save you from your own mistakes.

Not to say that most of us don’t make those mistakes early on–and fortunately, most of us survive none the worse for them. I well remember heading offshore on Florida’s west coast to capture kingfish in a 15-foot jonboat with a single 10-horse outboard that only started when it felt like it, and without a sign of a radio aboard–and this was well before the age of the cell phone. I had 25 feet of anchor line on board, one gas-station sandwich and a gallon jug of water. It seemed enough to get out there two or three miles, catch fish and come home, and I did.

That sort of youthful impulsiveness can get you killed, of course, but somehow it did not. That was not the case in Louisiana, and a 19-year-old who loved fishing as much as most of us who read these words do is gone. We can never remind ourselves or our loved ones often enough that the sea is unforgiving. Here are just a few of the most basic reminders that help to keep us safe:

Never leave the dock without filing at least an informal float plan with someone who will know immediately if you don’t come back when you planned.

Never leave the dock without a dependable communications device. A cell phone can work if you’re headed a mile or two offshore or into the backcountry–but remember that cell phones are not waterproof. Get it wet and you’ve got nothing. Otherwise, you’ll need at least a VHF, which typically has a 25-mile range. Any farther, you’ll need a sat phone or SSB to have any hope of reaching someone.

An EPIRB is an essential piece of equipment today for offshore boating. Push the emergency button and the first-responders know you need help and exactly where to find you–it’s incomparable insurance at a modest price.

Never head offshore in a single-engine boat unless you’re accompanied by another boat. Every mechanical contrivance can break down. Even new engines sometimes get the hiccups. At least carry a “kicker” of 10-horses or better that can get you home slowly but surely if necessary. Twin engines add a big get-home factor.

Remember that fuel economy varies with fuel conditions. Burn no more than 1/3 of your fuel going out, 1/4 trolling, and 1/3 returning–always plan on some reserve because if a strong wind or rough seas come up, it can take far more fuel to get home than it took going out.

Both by law and by common sense, you need a quality life preserver on board of the right size to fit every passenger. Put ‘em where you can reach ‘em fast–you may have only seconds if a wave comes over the transom. In iffy conditions, wear the preservers.

Carry a lot more drinking water than you ever expect to need. At least a half-gallon per person per day is a must–and you’ll want twice that if you’re out there in hot weather. It’s wise to take enough for three days anytime you go offshore. Ditto for food, in waterproof packaging.

Rain gear keeps you comfortable in a shower, and if you’re adrift, it can keep you warm overnight. Buy good raingear for everyone aboard and keep it where you can get it fast.

Last but not least, remember the oceans are deep and wide–and your boat should be, also. Lots of freeboard, lots of beam, and the more length the better keeps you safe. These days, I’d consider a 25-footer with an 8’6″ beam my personal minimum, though I ran a 23 and picked my days for a good while without problems.

There’s no boat and no preparation that will absolutely keep you safe in all conditions. But following the basics of good seamanship and common sense can go a long way in the right direction.

Fishing A Lake Oconee April Tournament

Last Sunday 15 members and guests of the Flint River Bass Club fished our April tournament at Lake Oconee. We choose Lake Oconee April Tournament because fishing is usually good there. In 8.5 hours of casting we brought in 38 bass over the 14 inch size limit. There were five five-bass limits and two people didn’t bring in a keeper.

Travis Weatherly won it all with five weighing 13.01 pounds and his 3.44 pound largemouth was big bass. Chuck Croft was second with five at 10.12 pounds, I came in third with five weighing 9.32 pounds and Niles Murray placed fourth with five at 8.88 pounds.

When we took off I noticed everyone but me went up the Oconee River from Long Shoals ramp. The water was more stained that way than it was in Double Branches where I headed. And it seems the bite was different. I tried spinnerbaits and crankbaits but never got a bite on them. But at weigh-in the other three finishing in the top four all said they caught their fish on spinnerbaits and crankbaits.

After about 30 minutes I stopped fishing those faster moving baits and switched to a Texas rigged lizard, and almost immediately caught a good keeper. So I kept fishing it and had three at 9:00 in the first cove we fished.

The next cove we went to I quickly filled my limit by 10:00 on the lizard but then it got tough. I fished hard but at 2:30 had not caught another keeper. My partner Wesley DeLay and I both caught a lot of 13 inch bass, too short to weigh in.

Finally at 2:30 I landed a bass big enough to cull my smallest fish. But that was it, I landed six keepers all day.

Most tournament fishermen want to be in control of the boat and fish from the front. At times it makes big difference, and it seemed to Sunday. Travis fished by himself so it did not make a difference, but JJ Polak fished from the back of Chuck’s boat. Chuck had five, JJ had one keeper. I had five and Wesley, fishing behind me, had one. And Niles had five while Jack Ridgeway, fishing from the back of his boat, had one.

I’m not sure why it made a difference. Wesley and I both were fishing the same bait. I steadily moved down the bank and the fish I caught were not on any kind of visible cover. So each of us were blind casting to the same water. I probably made a cast every 20 feet or so, leaving lots of un-fished water between casts.

A bass will move a couple of feet to hit a bait like a lizard but I don’t think they will move ten feet one way or the other to hit one. Bass are ambush fish, relying on a short burst of speed to catch and eat their quarry. For them to move ten feet to hit something moving along the bottom would be unusual, I think.

But who knows why bass act like they do. I have certainly had plenty of days when my partner beat me from the back of the boat and I’m sure it will happen a lot more times.

Managing Chinook Seasons in Idaho

Managing Chinook Seasons Is A Constant Work In Progress

By Roger Phillips, Idaho Fish and Game public information specialist
from The Fishing Wire

Idaho Chinook

Idaho Chinook

Spring Chinook fishing opens April 23, and anglers often wonder how many salmon there will be and how long the season will last. It’s a challenging question to answer because unlike most Idaho fisheries, salmon seasons are dependent on how many fish return from the ocean each year.

That number varies wildly from year to year, and Fish and Game must balance the wants of anglers with ensuring enough Chinook are available to keep hatcheries operating, protect wild fish listed under the Endangered Species Act, and abide by agreements with other states and tribes to share the harvest of hatchery Chinook.

It’s a tricky mix of management that can complicate the answer for folks who just want to know how long salmon season will last.

The good news

Idaho has had an unprecedented run of chinook fishing seasons. This year will be the 16th straight year Fish and Game has provided a season, which is the longest unbroken streak dating back to 1954. Before then, salmon fishing was largely unregulated.

Chinook fishing kicks off with the spring run, and there’s fishing in the Snake River, Clearwater River and Salmon River and several tributaries. Over the last 20 years, spring chinook runs have averaged 54,160 fish annually. The previous 20 years (1976-95), the spring runs averaged 17,646, and fishing seasons were sporadic and often short-lived.

Last year, about 95,300 hatchery chinook crossed Lower Granite Dam about 25 miles downstream from Lewiston. Non-tribal anglers in Idaho harvested 22,075 of them during the spring and summer seasons.

The forecast for this year is 66,100 hatchery fish to cross Lower Granite, which means about 24,000 will be available for sport anglers to harvest. But biologists won’t know how exactly how many can be harvested until fish start reaching Idaho, and the run has just started.

Forecasting the season

Each winter, Fish and Game biologists predict the upcoming run based on the return of jacks from the previous year. Young salmon, known as smolts, migrate to the ocean each spring at about two years old. Those smolts grow in the ocean and return over the next three years.

Some chinook return to rivers after spending only a year in the ocean. They’re known as “jacks” because they’re almost all males, and younger than most other salmon returning. Most chinook that return to Idaho spend two years in the ocean, so the number of jacks is an indicator of how many “two-ocean” chinook will return the following year.

Finally, a small percentage returns after three years in the ocean, and on rare occasions, four years.

Biologists use last year’s jack salmon return to forecast the size of this year’s run, and that information allows Fish and Game to set a salmon season before the first Chinook arrives in Idaho.

Biologists also monitor the run as fish move past fish counters at the dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers, and they use fish embedded with tiny electronic tags known as PIT tags to determine where the fish are headed.

“We’re able to make the forecast of fish returning to each hatchery or river section based on PIT-tagged fish,” Fish and Game’s anadromous fish manager Pete Hassemer said.

Spring run

Chinook start crossing Lower Granite Dam in April, but the peak usually hits in May. That’s when Fish and Game closely watches the number of fish arriving in Idaho, where they’re heading, and how many fish anglers are catching.

Since the seasons and limits were based on a forecast, it’s important to track the actual return and harvest by anglers. Small daily bag limits help keep the harvest within quotas and spread the fishery over a larger area and ensure enough fish are available for anglers farther upstream.

“We’re catching fish in the early part of the run without knowing exactly how many fish are coming back,” Hassemer said. “Fishing can be really good, and there’s a limited number of fish available to anglers, so they can catch those fairly quickly.”

How’s fishing?

It’s more than a curious question – it’s how Fish and Game determines how many fish are caught each day and how long the season lasts. Fish and Game personnel count anglers and interview them throughout the fishery to see how many fish they’re catching.

“Our creel program has been designed to ensure we conduct enough angler counts and interview enough anglers to have a good understanding of how many fish are caught each day,” Hassemer said.

Fish and Game communicates weekly with the other states, tribes and federal agencies during the season to share information. By Tuesday of each week, biologists have a good idea if there are enough fish remaining to sustain fishing through the following weekend.

Fish and Game posts updated information on its web page so anglers can see how many have been caught. They can find that information at http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/ by looking the under “Chinook Salmon” under the Fishing tab. (Direct link: http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/fish/?getPage=114).

The goal is to provide good information for anglers so they have a better understanding where fish are being caught, how good the fishing is, and when closures might occur.

“We generally avoid closing on Friday because we want to give anglers as much opportunity as we can,” he said.

Different rivers, different fisheries

But anglers should remember that their portion of the Chinook return can be caught very quickly, especially when fishing is good and the harvest share is modest.

That’s often the case during popular river stretches. On the Lower Clearwater River, the season typically lasts about 15 days after the first fish arrive. On the South Fork of the Salmon River, the harvest share can be caught within a few days of the peak run arriving.

“Once fish start arriving in the smaller streams and the water is low and clear, anglers are quite successful,” Hassemer said.

Fishing seasons on the Lower Salmon and Little Salmon rivers tend to last longer and are a little more predictable.

Snowpack and spring run-off influence the timing of the runs. Spring chinook tend to follow peak spring run-off, so when the Salmon River starts receding, usually in late May, early June, it’s time to go salmon fishing.

Biologists also carefully watch tag data to ensure fish bound for hatcheries in the Upper Salmon aren’t overharvested lower in the river system. Long-term data shows about 90 percent of the chinook harvested in the Salmon River around Riggins and White Bird are bound for the Rapid River Hatchery.

A moving target

Considering forecasts rarely predict the exact number of fish, biologists keep a watchful eye on the actual return. Sometimes late-returning fish will allow them to keep the season open a little longer. Other times, fewer fish than expected return, and the season is cut short.

But Fish and Game’s goal is to ensure anglers get an equitable share of the available harvest.

“We really try to make sure we don’t close too early and have anglers off the water when they could be fishing for these prized salmon,” Hassemer said.

Hillary Lying About Guns

Politicians don’t tell the truth. Its just the way of politics to tell people what you think they want to hear. Exaggerations, misleading statements and similar things are the rule. But sometimes politicians tell such blatant lies it is hard to understand how anyone can listen to them.

Hillary Clinton is constantly telling lies about gun laws, the gun business and why you and I own guns, all the time trying to make it harder for us to own a gun while she is hiding behind armed guards. The current lie of the day is that gun manufacturers and sellers are not liable for their product the same way other business are for their product.

The stated goal of the anti-gun groups is to put gun manufactures and retailers out of business by suing them when a gun is used in a crime. That is like Rosie O’Donnell suing spoon manufacturers because she is fat. Or it is like suing a gas station and Shell oil because someone buys a gallon of gas and uses it to burn down a house.

The law suits got so ridiculous a few years ago that our elected representatives passed a federal law that gun manufacturers and retailers were not liable if their product was misused. That is the way it is with every product made but liberal judges were singling out the gun industry. And they still are doing that, trying to put them out of business.

A state judge in New Jersey ruled last week a suit against Remington could proceed, even though there is federal law against such lawsuits. That lawsuit says Remington should not have made a gun for civilian sales that is a military weapon. Anyone knowing anything about guns knows the multiple fallacies of that claim.

Gun banners can’t get laws passed that they want because there are too many gun owners and other rational people opposing them. So they try to go through the courts to accomplish their goals. They can’t stand the thought of a law abiding citizen having something they personally don’t approve of so they try to ban it for everyone.

What Is Walleye Egg Collection?

Walleye Egg Collection 101

The Ohio Division of Wildlife has been asked to collect 200 quarts of walleye eggs from Mosquito Reservoir for hatchery production this spring.
from The Fishing Wire

What does this mean? How do they do it? Why do they do this? What is the end result?

From start to finish…

net setting

net setting

The Net Set
• ODNR Crews set 16 trap nets on Mosquito Reservoir to collect fish.
• Nets are set in shallow water- 14 feet deep or less.
• Nets are set from the causeway to the dam, primarily on the east side
• Fish hit the lead (red line) and swim toward deeper water towards the work up area
• IF YOU SEE A NET, PLEASE STAY AWAY FROM IT!!!!!

Running the Nets
• If it swims, we catch it! Walleye, crappie, perch, sunfish, and catfish are commonly caught, but we do catch pike, bass, and an occasional mudpuppy.
• Fish are netted from the end of the net and processed on the boat.
• Female walleyes ready to spawn are the target. 15 – 22″ is normal- 25″ and up have been seen!

Taking eggs

Taking eggs

Egg Take at The Ramp
• Female walleye eggs are mixed with either walleye sperm to make walleye OR sauger sperm to make saugeyes.
• Each quart of walleye eggs taken can yield 130,000 fish.
• A large female walleye can have 2 quarts in her!

At The Hatchery
• Fertilized walleye eggs are taken back to Senecaville State Fish Hatchery (Guernsey Co.).
• Eggs can die off due to low water flow, fungus, poor fertilization, or rapid temperature changes.
• Fish are then hatched off in jars in about 3 weeks.

Walleye fry

Walleye fry

Back at the Lake
• Fish can either be stocked as fry (see above) or fingerling (see right), depending on the lake.
• Fry are 1/4″ long, are stocked in late April, and typically stocked at a rate of 1000 / acre of water.
• Fingerling are 1-2 inches long, are stocked in late May, and are typically stocked at a rate of 100 / acre of water.

The End Result?
• Fish stocked in the spring will grow to 8 inches by September.
• More importantly, fish stocked in 2012 will be about 15 inches within 2 years. They grow REALLY fast with how much gizzard shad there is for them to eat!
• We know that some fish will die throughout this process. Taking the eggs from the female walleye is rough on them, especially when the water is warmer.
• Also, stocking such small fish will lead to some of them dying. If we get 1/10 of 1% (0.001) of the fish we stock to live to reach 15″, we are doing great!

But the bottom line is that without these efforts, walleye fishing on most of our inland lakes would not exist. Natural reproduction is not consistent enough to keep these high quality walleye fisheries going each and every year. Habitat is poor, and the conditions for a good natural spawn are rarely achieved- see Lake Erie!

The Ohio Division of Wildlife conserves and improves fish and wildlife resources and their habitats for sustainable use and appreciation by all.

Lake Guntersville Fishing Report from Captain Mike Gerry

Lake Guntersville Fishing Report

Check out these weekly updated reports for selected lakes in Georgia and Alabama Lakes Fishing Report. If any guides or fishermen do weekly reports and would like them published on my site please contact me: ronnie@fishing-about.com

Captain Mike with nice Guntersville bass

Captain Mike with nice Guntersville bass

Fishing Report, Lake Guntersville 4/16/16

Well if you didn’t like 30 mph winds out of the NNW you got to experience them out of the ESE; I am sure it made you feel better or maybe not! The past 3 weeks we have just been hammed by strong winds and spending day fishing was challenging because of it. Sure we caught fish but it was some of the most aggravating times on the water I have spent in quite a while.

The bass are still very much staging waiting for the water to get a little warmer I don’t believe we have seen the best of the spawn yet, and because of it bites are still at a premium and missing can really hurt your day. We spent most of the week fishing 3 to 6 feet of water with some spotted moves to the deeper water checking for post spawn fish. If the best of the spawn is over Guntersville is in trouble, I have just got to think we are behind but this week should really make a difference with the weather warming up considerable.

Baits for the week have not changed a whole lot with Tight-Line Swim jigs, leading the way with most of the bites rigged with Missile Bait Shock Wave swim baits; we did add SPRO crank baits to the everyday baits with their Baby Little John DD 60 catching several fish in 7 to 9 ft. of water.

Come fish with me no one will treat you better, I have days and guides available to fish with you!

Fish Lake
Fish Lake Guntersville Guide Service

Email: bassguide@comcast.net
Phone: 256 759 2270
Captain Mike Gerry

Clarks Hill – Lake Thurmond Fishing Report

Fishing Report for Clarks Hill – Lake Thurmond

Want specific holes to fish each month of the year on Clarks Hill – Lake Thurmond? Check out “Keys To Catching Clarks Hill Bass” in eBook format, with ten spots for each month of the year, with GPS coordinates, how to fish each and lures to use. The eBook is $4.99. Now available on CD ($6.00) or Email ($4.00) – contact me at ronnie@fishing-about.com I may have some copies printed but the price would be about $10.00. If you want a printed copy please email me at ronnie@fishing-about.com to reserve a copy if I do have them printed.

Check out these weekly updated reports for selected lakes in Georgia and Alabama Lakes Fishing Report. If any guides or fishermen do weekly reports and would like them published on my site please contact me: ronnie@fishing-about.com

“The Southern Fishing Report”
By Ken Sturdivant
106 Hickory Ridge
770 889 2654
Cumming Georgia 30040
www.southernfishing.com

April 15, 2016

CLARKS HILL IS FULL, 60’S

Bass fishing is good. The lake is clear towards the middle and slightly stained up in the rivers and creeks. The water temperature is 62 to 64 degrees. Use a lot baits to catch these shallow bass. Chug Bugs are working on the cloudy days when a slight wind is present. On the points, the 3/8 ounce and 1/2 ounce spinnerbaits will work on the larger bass, but not as many. Bass are currently on the flats either on or around the bedding areas. Shad Raps and Bandits are great baits to use on these shallow water bass. Shallow Shad Raps will work for some quality fish. The bottom grass is continuing to grow and these are areas that always hold bass. Next week bass will be on the beds Pink Trick worms will work. Also use the Rapala DT6 crank bait on the outer edges of the grass. Crawdad and shad are the best colors.

Lowrance Pro Staff, KEN STURDIVANT will teach a FREE! SONAR Class on Saturday afternoon, May 28, 2016 at 1pm at the Cabela’s store in Greenville, South Carolina. See www.cabelas.com for details.

Lowrance HDS Gen3 software is now on www.lowrance.com. Here are the highlights: TotalScan™ Skimmer® Transducer, Precision 9 Solid State Compass, SiriusXM® Local Weather Feature (North America only), Network Analyzer and Service Assistant

Lowrance Gen2 Touch update is now on www.lowrance.com. Here are the highlights: Precision 9 Solid State Compass, SiriusXM® Local Weather Feature (North America only), Network Analyzer and Service Assistant

We have the LOWRANCE Gen 3 Touch and 3D NEW Lowrance Technology on our boat. Bring any HDS machine only to Lake Lanier and learn it ALL in one day. Call Ken for details.

Ken Sturdivant Lowrance Professional Fishing Staff will be conducting FREE Sonar Seminar at Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World in Lawrenceville Georgia on Saturday June 25, 2016 at 2pm. Seminar is subject to change without notice. Be sure to see the NEW Lowrance machines coming on www.lowrance.com

Our On the Water Schools are Rods Reels and Lures for Bass SONAR and we have a Striper school. Learn how to use the Lowrance Structure Scan and Down Scan technology. Call 770 889 2654 or see the details on our web site for more info and dates.fo

For a free set up sheet for your sonar send me an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com

Anglers have these books for sale BASS FISHING ON WEST POINT LAKE BASS FISHING LAKE RUSSELL BASS FISHING WEST POINT LAKE and BASS FISHING LAKE HARTWELL. These books have lots of bass fishing and covers every week of the year. Each book $39.00. If you would like a sample of any book send us an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com.

We offer these waypoints for sale. You get the coordinates and you load them into your GPS unit.

Lake Allatoona for $99.00 Lake Lanier for $99.00 Lake Oconee for $99.00 Lake Weiss for $99.00 Lake Hartwell for $99.00 WAYPOINTS ARE NOT REFUNDABLE

Insight Genesis announces the Varsity Rewards program for high school fishing teams. See this address www.varsityrewards.com for all the details.

Our mailing address is Southern Fishing Schools Inc. 106 Hickory Ridge Cumming Georgia 30040. 770 889 2654

Stop by www.gon.com on the forum page for current events.

Copyright 2014 Southern Fishing Schools Inc. calls us to set up a school Maps and Depth Finders or SONAR and Rods Reels and Lures for Bass. 770 889 2654.

Lake Lanier Fishing Report

Want specific holes to fish each month of the year on Lake Lanier? Check out Keys To Catching Lake Lanier Bass in eBook format, with ten spots for each month of the year, with GPS coordinates, how to fish each and lures to use. The eBook is $4.99. Now available on CD ($6.00) or Email ($4.00) – contact me at ronnie@fishing-about.com I may have some copies printed but the price would be about $10.00. If you want a printed copy please email me at ronnie@fishing-about.com to reserve a copy if I do have them printed.

Check out these weekly updated reports for selected lakes in Georgia and Alabama Lakes Fishing Report. If any guides or fishermen do weekly reports and would like them published on my site please contact me: ronnie@fishing-about.com

Fishing Report for Lake Lanier

“The Southern Fishing Report”
By Ken Sturdivant
106 Hickory Ridge
770 889 2654
Cumming Georgia 30040
www.southernfishing.com

April 15, 2016

LAKE LANIER IS DOWN .89 FEET, THE CREEKS ARE STAINED AND THE MAIN LAKE IS CLEAR & LOW 60’S

This report brought to you by Jimbo on Lanier 770 542 7764 www.jimboonlanier.com

Bass fishing on Lake Lanier this past week has again been excellent. A wake bait or a bomber has been our first choice in the mornings. The focus with these baits should be fairly shallow on flats and shallower rocky points and humps as well. A steady slow retrieve has been best for these baits. When the wake bait/bomber bite slows down, switch to a worm on a 1/8 ounce Davis Shaky Head in these same areas, if the wind will allow. Focus on points at the mouths of spawning pockets and on secondary points as well. A drop shot rig with a 4″ worm cast to steep rock banks and points has again been productive this past week. Work the rig like a shaky head and watch for light bites. Long running flat points are holding fish as well. Often these fish can be found in the 8 10 foot depth ranges or shallower on top of these points. A jerkbait and a swimbait, along with a spinnerbait have been productive on these shallower rocky points as well. Try a straight retrieve with both the swimbait and the jerkbait as well as the spinnerbait. Again, other than early morning, wind is important for this bite. The Largemouth are up shallow all around the lake. Look in the backs of creeks and pockets to find these critters. Docks in these areas are a good bet for these fish. A number of lures can work depending on the conditions, but all the normal fare are good choices. Thanks for all the calls I am completely booked for April. Here is what I have open in early May: 2, 6, 10, 11, 12, and 13. The spots are on fire! Don’t miss out! Give me a call and let’s go fishing.

This Lake Lanier Striper report is from Captain Ken West and Captain Mike Maddalena of www.bigfishonguide.com

Striper fishing has slowed with the cold fronts and corresponding drop in the surface temperature. The good news is the weather looks great for the weekend and I am confident the fishing will be “on” again. The fish are pre spawn and have been feeding aggressively. There are fish on Points Lake wide. Get out your top water, buck tail jigs and hit the points and reef markers. The Red Fin has been the hot top water bait with the Spook close behind. In addition free lines and planner boards with Herring have also been working. Fish your planner boards with single split shot 35 to 50 feet behind the boards and set your free lines at 70 to 100 feet behind the boat. Keep your trolling motor speed between .6 and 1.0 miles per hour. Target half way back in the creeks and pull flats as well as points. We have had some reports of a night bite with Bombers on points. The Umbrella rig is also working. Set your Umbrella rigs at 70 to 90 feet behind the boat and pull at 2.6 to 3.3 MPH. Flat Creek, Balus Creek and the creeks up the Chestatee have continued to be the hot spots. The lake temperature is in the low to mid 60’s and the water is clear on the main lake and stained in the backs of the creeks. The lake is at full pool.

To book your guide trip call us at 404 561 2564 or contact us on our web site.

www.bigfishonguide.com

Striper fishing has slowed with the cold fronts and corresponding drop in the surface temperature. The good news is the weather looks great for the weekend and we are confident the fishing will be “on” again. The fish are pre spawn and have been feeding aggressively. There are fish on Points Lake wide. Get out your top water, buck tail jigs and hit the points and reef markers. The Red Fin has been the hot top water bait with the Spook close behind. In addition free lines and planner boards with Herring have also been working. Fish your planner boards with single split shot 35 to 50 feet behind the boards and set your free lines at 70 to 100 feet behind the boat. Keep your trolling motor speed between .6 and 1.0 miles per hour. Target half way back in the creeks and pull flats as well as points. We have had some reports of a night bite with Bombers on points. The Umbrella rig is also working. Set your umbrella rigs at 70 to 90 feet behind the boat and pull at 2.6 to 3.3 MPH. Flat Creek, Balus Creek and the creeks up the Chestatee have continued to be the hot spots. The lake temperature is in the low to mid 60’s and the water is clear on the main lake and stained in the backs of the creeks. The lake is at full pool. To book your guide trip call us at 404 561 2564 or contact us on our web site. www.bigfishonguide.com
This Lake Lanier Crappie report is from Dan Saknini, member of the Lanier Crappie Angler’s Club. See our club’s website, www.laniercrappieanglers.net

The combination of cool temperatures and high winds is maintaining the water temperature in the low sixties. The wind has been a big challenge while fishing. However, even with these conditions, fishing is good to excellent. As mentioned previously, we are fishing both the pre spawn as well as the post spawn, with some fish having already spawned and some fish waiting to spawn. Both have one thing in common: crappie ALWAYS relate to structure. They may leave their habitat in pursuit of bait, but they always return. That is why you can target fish using different methods. If you prefer using crappie minnows under a cork, the blowdowns and brush piles close to docks in shallower water are going to be your best bet. Blowdowns are beginning to produce quality fish. Do not overrule using a jig. In my opinion, it may work better. As stated in the past, some of these blowdowns are in 10 feet of water, but some are in 20 feet of water, depending on the size of the tree. Look at the size of the trunk, compare to nearby trees and estimate the height of the similar trees. Also look at the slope of the bank. All these factors will help you determine the location and depth of the tree in the water. Make sure you fish the blowdown at every possible angle before moving on. After you finish fishing a blowdown, ride over it with your Lowrance Down Scan and it will give you the accurate depth of the tree as a reference for your next trip. You may also want to mark a waypoint on your electronics if the spot was a good producer. Hair jigs and soft body jigs are working well. Long line trolling, is also working well. The fish chasing bait are the targets of this method. If you are a dock shooter, game on! We are catching them in docks at various depths with structure (both deep and shallow). Use your Lowrance side scan to locate brush inside docks. Warmer days together with good fishing is a great recipe for an awesome time on the lake. Wear your life jacket it can save your life!

Lowrance Pro Staff, KEN STURDIVANT will teach a FREE! SONAR Class on Saturday afternoon, May 28, 2016 at 1pm at the Cabela’s store in Greenville, South Carolina. See www.cabelas.com for details.

We have the LOWRANCE Gen 3 Touch and 3D NEW Lowrance Technology on our boat. Bring any HDS machine only to Lake Lanier and learn it ALL in one day. Call Ken for details.

For a free set up sheet for your sonar send me an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com

Anglers have these books for sale BASS FISHING ON WEST POINT LAKE BASS FISHING LAKE RUSSELL BASS FISHING WEST POINT LAKE and BASS FISHING LAKE HARTWELL. These books have lots of bass fishing and covers every week of the year. Each book $39.00. If you would like a sample of any book send us an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com.

We offer these waypoints for sale. You get the coordinates and you load them into your GPS unit

Lake Allatoona for $99.00 Lake Lanier for $99.00 Lake Oconee for $99.00 Lake Weiss for $99.00 Lake Hartwell for $99.00 WAYPOINTS ARE NOT REFUNDABLE

Our mailing address is Southern Fishing Schools Inc. 106 Hickory Ridge Cumming Georgia 30040. 770 889 2654

Stop by www.gon.com on the forum page for current events.

Copyright 2013 Southern Fishing Schools Inc. calls us to set up a school Maps and Depth Finders or SONAR and Rods Reels and Lures for Bass. 770 889 2654.

Lake Allatoona Fishing Report

Fishing Report for Lake Allatoona

“The Southern Fishing Report”
By Ken Sturdivant
106 Hickory Ridge
770 889 2654
Cumming Georgia 30040
www.southernfishing.com

Check out these weekly updated reports for selected lakes in Georgia and Alabama Lakes Fishing Report. If any guides or fishermen do weekly reports and would like them published on my site please contact me: ronnie@fishing-about.com

April 15, 2016

LAKE ALLATOONA IS FULL, 60’S & CLEARING

This bass fishing report is from Matt Driver 404 456 6094 www.proanglerradio.com

Bass fishing is great. There has been a good soft plastic bite for the past week or so. Shaky heady and Carolina rigs have been a good way to produce numbers of spotted bass. Big bite bait Shaky squirrel and the Big Bite are fighting frog in tilapia color/chartreuse tail have been the ticket. I am still expecting a big pull up for spawning bass on the next moon, even though there are some fish own bed now. We are seeing more and more schooling/feeding frenzy action as we near the spawn for spotted bass. These fish move constantly and very rarely are the same place two days straight. Allow the wind direction guide you two areas where bait may be ambushed such as small wind blown pockets and points. A Spro McStick jerk bait, Spro dawg and BB jerk minnow are great baits for schooling fish. This week should be good because the weather will stabilize and warmer temperatures are forecasted.

This Lake Allatoona Fishing Guides Report has been brought to you exclusively by Robert Eidson of First Bite Guide Service, 770 827 6282. www.firstbiteguideservice.com Lake Allatoona, Georgia email: eidson6260@att.net

Line sides fishing is good. The spawn run is in a holding pattern right now do to the rain and multiple cold fronts with have had the last two weeks, Most of the fish are still on the main lake and are on a holding pattern waiting for the upcoming run. Big schools of hybrids can be found anywhere from the S turns to as far south as Tanyard Creek. The down rod bite is the most productive bite going on the lake right now. Fishing live shad at depths from 20 to 30 feet is producing for our boats from one end of the lake to the other. Our bait of choose has been big Thread Fins with small gizzards running a close second. These fish can be found on your Lowrance on or around most points, humps and flats. Lowrance electronics can be a big help during the summer months. Spring time fishing is here give us a call at 770 827 6282 and let’s take the kids fishing.

We have the BASS FISHING LAKE ALLATOONA book for sale $39.00 total. If you would like a sample send an e mail to ken@southernfishing.

Lowrance Pro Staff, KEN STURDIVANT will teach a FREE! SONAR Class on Saturday afternoon, May 28, 2016 at 1pm at the Cabela’s store in Greenville, South Carolina. See www.cabelas.com for details.

We have the LOWRANCE Gen 3 Touch and 3D NEW Lowrance Technology on our boat. Bring any HDS machine only to Lake Lanier and learn it ALL in one day. Call Ken for details.

Our On the Water Schools are Rods Reels and Lures for Bass SONAR and we have a Striper school. Learn how to use the Lowrance Structure Scan and Down Scan technology. Call 770 889 2654 or see the details on our web site for more info and dates.fo

For a free set up sheet for your sonar send me an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com

Anglers have these books for sale BASS FISHING ON WEST POINT LAKE BASS FISHING LAKE RUSSELL BASS FISHING WEST POINT LAKE and BASS FISHING LAKE HARTWELL. These books have lots of bass fishing and covers every week of the year. Each book $39.00. If you would like a sample of any book send us an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com.

We offer these waypoints for sale. You get the coordinates and you load them into your GPS unit

Lake Allatoona for $99.00 Lake Lanier for $99.00 Lake Oconee for $99.00 Lake Weiss for $99.00 Lake Hartwell for $99.00 WAYPOINTS ARE NOT REFUNDABLE

Our mailing address is Southern Fishing Schools Inc. 106 Hickory Ridge Cumming Georgia 30040. 770 889 2654

Stop by www.gon.com on the forum page for current events.

Copyright 2014 Southern Fishing Schools Inc. calls us to set up a school Maps and Depth Finders or SONAR and Rods Reels and Lures for Bass. 770 889 2654.

West Point Lake Fishing Report

Fishing Report for West Point Lake

“The Southern Fishing Report”
By Ken Sturdivant
106 Hickory Ridge
770 889 2654
Cumming Georgia 30040
www.southernfishing.com

Check out these weekly updated reports for selected lakes in Georgia and Alabama Lakes Fishing Report. If any guides or fishermen do weekly reports and would like them published on my site please contact me: ronnie@fishing-about.com

April 15, 2016

WEST POINT LAKE IS DOWN 2.5 FEET STAINED & LOW 70’S

Bass fishing for both spots and largemouth is fair as the full moon gets close. Largemouth bass are in pre spawn to spawn so continue fishing primary and secondary points, coves and pockets on major creeks down lake. Use a Rat L Traps and buzz baits shallow with a double willow blade combination. Slow roll the spinnerbait around any cover on the points and in the coves and pockets. The important thing right now is to cover a lot of water. Trick worms and Super Flukes can work almost any time of the day and work the shallow wood cover and the shadows early and late.

SEE NOTICE FROM THE CORP OF ENGINEERS BELOW.

From the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Due to recent heavy rains, excess sediment deposits have pushed down from the Chattahoochee River leaving silt formations in the lake channel thus narrowing the navigation channel north of the Georgia Highway 219 river bridge. This area is between Georgia Park and Ringer Park. In addition, a large sandbar has formed along the west side of the river channel. Too properly mark the river channel, red and green buoys will be replaced with mid channel buoys (black and white vertically stripped) which identify the center of the channel. Boaters should navigate near these buoys to ensure deeper water. Shoal markers will be installed to identify the sandbar. Boaters should proceed with caution in this stretch of river and always be on the lookout for floating debris.

We have GPS Bass fishing locations and a BASS FISHING WEST POINT LAKE book for sale. Ask ken for a sample. This book is $39.00. If you would like a sample send us an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com

Lowrance Pro Staff, KEN STURDIVANT will teach a FREE! SONAR Class on Saturday afternoon, May 28, 2016 at 1pm at the Cabela’s store in Greenville, South Carolina. See www.cabelas.com for details.

We have the LOWRANCE Gen 3 Touch and 3D NEW Lowrance Technology on our boat. Bring any HDS machine only to Lake Lanier and learn it ALL in one day. Call Ken for details.

Our On the Water Schools are Rods Reels and Lures for Bass SONAR and we have a Striper school. Learn how to use the Lowrance Structure Scan and Down Scan technology. Call 770 889 2654 or see the details on our web site for more info and dates.fo

For a free set up sheet for your sonar send me an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com

Anglers have these books for sale BASS FISHING ON WEST POINT LAKE BASS FISHING LAKE RUSSELL BASS FISHING WEST POINT LAKE and BASS FISHING HARTWELL. These books have lots of bass fishing and covers every week of the year. Each book $39.00. If you would like a sample of any book send us an e mail to ken@southernfishing.com.

We offer these waypoints for sale. You get the coordinates and you load them into your GPS unit

Lake Allatoona for $99.00 Lake Lanier for $99.00 Lake Oconee for $99.00 Lake Weiss for $99.00 Lake Hartwell for $99.00 WAYPOINTS ARE NOT REFUNDABLE

Our mailing address is Southern Fishing Schools Inc. 106 Hickory Ridge Cumming Georgia 30040. 770 889 2654

Stop by www.gon.com on the forum page for current events.

Copyright 2013 Southern Fishing Schools Inc. calls us to set up a school Maps and Depth Finders or SONAR and Rods Reels and Lures for Bass. 770 889 2654.